roasting for cold brew

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Postby clarktheroaster » Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:52 am

Is anyone experimenting with best roast profiles for cold brew coffee?

It's my conjecture that longer, slightly darker, slowly developed roast will be a better profile to extract a well balanced, rich flavor. Right now I'm roasting for 12:30 - 13:00 minutes, drop temp at 405 ish with a javalytics score of around 63

Does anyone have thoughts on a roast profile for cold brew, they could share?

Warm regards,
Clark
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Postby Jamestooill » Sun Jul 19, 2015 6:13 am

Clark,

We played around with roasting for cold brew too. I don't know how close agtron gourmet numbers are to Javalytics numbers. But I'd be willing to bet we're at similar roast levels. We didn't find any benefits from roasting slower to 1st, but it did help the balance alot when we pushed the development time longer and made sure the beans were nice and fully expanded. Basically, roasts that extracted more in our cupping bowls also tasted more balanced as a cold brew. Some short from 1st crack to finish roasts were less soluble and acceptable hot in cupping bowls but vegetal in cold-brew.

Hope that helps.
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Postby AnandaKavanagh » Wed Jul 22, 2015 4:31 am

I agree with James, we've found a lengthy RD phase (about 30-32% of overall roast length) dropped about 5-10 degrees shy of 1c yields the best results. A little longer than a standard medium, not quite as dark as a full city, emphasis on continuous development and expansion. Too light and the cold brew is unpleasantly sour, too dark and it's really tannic/bitter. We actually ended up using the same coffee we're pulling as a house espresso with reeeallly freakin good results.

Happy hunting! :mrgreen:
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Postby AnandaKavanagh » Wed Jul 22, 2015 4:33 am

Oh and we've between 53-56WB ideal in terms of agtron reading. Hope this helps!
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Postby MichaelCleaver » Wed Jul 29, 2015 9:04 am

I agree with AnandaKavanagh when it comes to espresso beans for cold brew. We tried a lighter roast with shorter development and it came out good, but slightly sour and vegetal (more so than our hot brewing). The appeal of cold brew seems to be its low acid (even though cold beverages like soda seem to be more refreshing with higher acid).
We settled on our earthier character coffees with extended development for a nice smooth cold brew. We did not need to roast darker to make a good cold brew. 8-)

Following the acid lines comes the gas for cold brew storage (if you keg your brew) We partnered with a local brewery to brew a large batch of cold brew, and used CO2 as the gas for the fermentor (brew tank, no fermentation occured) and pure nitrogen for storage. The carbonic acid tastes great in beer, but not in cold brew! The results were fine in small quantities at the brewery, but we ended up tossing half the keg we brought back to our coffee shop :( .
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Postby AnandaKavanagh » Mon Aug 24, 2015 5:04 am

Yikes! That sucks. We were working with another roastery to develop a shelf-stable product - the first year we launched it we could only give it a refrigerated life of a month. Being 100% FTO limited us in terms of additives. Citric acid as a stabilizer also yielded astonishingly vile results, like someone stirred fermented OJ into the coffee.
This year we went with taps and kegerators ;)
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