roasting variety specific profiles

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Postby gboscana » Thu Feb 13, 2014 9:58 am

Hey everyone. I have been roasting for a while now, and the one thing I haven't really grasped, or felt any confidence in is really profiling for a specific variety. Now I know all the variables that are present in roasting without adding variety, but i was wondering if anyone had found any literature, or kept logs of profiles that were specific to the variety of coffee?
I have always been curious as the toughest varieties for me to roast have traditionally been the Pacamara/Maragogype types and the Mokka.
Also, I would like to bring back the concept of airflow as it related to profiling a roast. Discuss! Let's keep the forum alive people. :D
Paramo Coffee Roasters
be kind, fair and compassionate, always.
gboscana
 
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Postby ChrisSchooley » Fri Feb 28, 2014 4:01 pm

Hey Gabe! great discussion. I do think that in some extreme cases variety does require specific profiles; gesha, pacamaras, mokkas, even Ethio heirlooms, but I would say processing, bean density, and moisture content have a bigger impact on profiles in general.

That said, larger beans like the Pacamara and other typica's (maragogype is a typica, Pacas bourbon, but the size comes from the typica side) seem to respond better to a really gentle and slightly longer drying phase in order to take out some more of the starchy elements of the mouthfeel as well as help smooth the edge of some of the vegetal characteristics. The trick though is to not let it limp into 1st Crack, you need to get it really rolling into it.

As far as your airflow question, it's really related to the specific roaster. In some roasters increased airflow helps speed up a roast, and in others it slows it down because it's pulling away the ambient energy. Air flow can also affect moisture loss.

yay Gabe!
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Postby gboscana » Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:54 am

Right on Chris! Yeah, i noticed that you have to be super gentle with the larger beans like the Pacamaras and Maragogypes, I sully do almost like a Brazil profile on those guys. The thing that throws me off more than anything is the finishing of the roast on these. I feel like there is a very small window of getting it right.
Word up about airflow and moisture loss. This is something I sometimes forget, relationship wise. Thanks Chris!
Paramo Coffee Roasters
be kind, fair and compassionate, always.
gboscana
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 12:03 pm
First Name: Gabriel
Last Name: Boscana
City: Emeryville
State: CA
Zip Code: 94608
Company: Paramo Coffee Roasters
Occupation: roaster/buyer
Roasting Since (Year): 2006

Postby ChrisSchooley » Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:49 am

For sure, really the end of the roast is the most critical and where most of the subtle difference in profile lie, but I'd still say that adding a little bit of time to your drying phase can really make this a little easier to handle as long as you can also then push into the 1st Crack with some good momentum. Finishing these roasts though is where getting really comfortable and familiar with the different aromas through the roasting process can really be helpful. Being able to note when that pungent almost vinegar-like fragrance takes on some sweetness and then monitoring that sweetness to where you want it is key.
ChrisSchooley
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 3:35 pm
First Name: Christopher
Last Name: Schooley
City: Fort Collins
State: CO
Zip Code: 80526
Company: Coffee Shrub
Occupation: Roaster, Micro-Seller of Green Coffee
Roasting Since (Year): 2001
Website: http://www.coffeeshrub.com/.
Location: Fort Collins, CO.


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